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Benefits of Nasal Irrigation RSS



Safe Allergy Relief During Pregnancy

POSTED: JULY 16, 2019 For safe allergy relief during pregnancy, taking prescription drugs and over-the-counter allergy or decongestant medications may carry risks and side effects. A physician should always be consulted. The Mayo Clinic recommends nasal rinsing during pregnancy. In this article, Dr. Tobah addresses the topic of taking allergy medications, and listing many drug-free options, emphasizing the safe and effective practice of saline irrigation. From Mayo Clinic Is it safe to take allergy medications during pregnancy? Answer From Yvonne Butler Tobah, M.D. Allergy medications are sometimes recommended during pregnancy. However, before you take an allergy medication, consider ways to reduce your symptoms, including: Avoiding triggers. Limit your exposure to anything that triggers your allergy symptoms. Saline nasal spray. Over-the-counter saline nasal...

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CNN Calls this Allergy Season “Pollenpocalypse”

POSTED: APRIL 15, 2019 The photo above may make you want to sneeze just looking at it. According to CNN, the current pollen spike in the southeast, “comes primarily from the area’s trees, which include pine, oak, mulberry, birch and sweet gum.”   This Allergy Season is Being Called “Pollenpocalypse” “#ThePollening. It sounds like an M. Night Shyamalan horror film.” Why are pollen counts growing? It could be global warming. According to experts at the Allergy and Asthma Foundation of America (AAFA), “These pollen counts are getting higher today than ever before. This is attributable to climate change, experts say. “Warmer temperatures mean higher carbon dioxide levels, and that increases a plant’s production of pollen,” says Neeta Ogden, MD, an allergist in private practice in Englewood, New...

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Are You Breathing Polluted Air?

POSTED: JUNE 7, 2018 Take a deep breath. Just breathe. Inhale and exhale. These are all things we’re instructed to do throughout our day. Why? Because a breath of fresh air is supposed to be good for us. But – it turns out – we might be misinformed. According to a recent report, more than two out of every five people living in the United States are breathing in smog, air pollution, and the other unpleasantries that enter the environments of industrialized nations. Many things play into this – the smokestacks steaming up the urban skylines, the truck in front of you that hasn’t passed an emissions test since the 1980s, the trains chugging up and down the rails. But global warming plays...

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Ear Fullness: What’s It All About?

POSTED: MAY 24, 2018 We’ve all been there – the uncomfortable feeling that our ears can’t pop regardless of what we do. We try chewing gum, we plug our noses and swallow, we open and close our mouths so much we look like we’re participating in a lip-sync battle. But what is this feeling about? And how can some types of nasal rinse make it worse and some make it better? Lend us your ears The ears aren’t only for hearing (they hold our glasses in place, too). They are a complex network made up of bones, fluid, cavities, and passageways. The middle-ear is largely responsible for hearing, while the role of the inner-ear involves the dynamic maintenance of balance (that’s why some...

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Spring Allergies: Are They Behind Your Cold?

POSTED: APRIL 19, 2018 The common cold rears its stuffy head more often in cool weather – cold temps equal cold season. But the weather itself isn’t to blame. The idea that going outside with wet hair will automatically give you the sniffles? Lies! Instead, the cold comes from a virus and germs can enter your system whether it’s eight degrees outside or eighty. However, cool weather does irritate the nasal passages and make them vulnerable to germs (this is why colds show up more often in winter than summer). But allergies play a role in this, as well. Colds versus allergies Colds and allergies are not the same, but they often produce similar symptoms. A cold is caused by a virus, whereas...

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